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Longinius

Serbian primeminister assassinated

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As I said in the other thread, this is extremely bad both for Serbia and for the international community's dealing with Serbia. Djindjic was one of the very few moderate Serb leaders and he was essential in the extradition of Milosevic to the Hague. He was also one of the few that wanted Serbia to fully cooperate with the international community and accept responsibility for the war crimes comitted. Djindjic was also involved in getting rid of the influence of the mafia from Serbian commerce and politics.

May he rest in peace.

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (denoir @ Mar. 12 2003,16:14)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Djindjic was one of the very few moderate Serb leaders and he was essential in the extradition of Milosevic to the Hague. He was also one of the few that wanted Serbia to fully cooperate with the international community and accept responsibility for the war crimes comitted. Djindjic was also involved in getting rid of the influence of the mafia from Serbian commerce and politics.<span id='postcolor'>

That'll kill anybody. sad.gif

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From The Guardian:

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Only last month, Mr Djindjic survived an alleged assassination attempt when a lorry cut across his motorcade. He later dismissed the February 21 incident as a "futile effort" that could not stop democratic reforms.<span id='postcolor'>

Looks like he wasn't particulary popular in former Yugoslavia (I'm not using the word Serbia because the people behind this assassination might well come from the neighbouring countries). I guess this is a prime example how there is a lot of work to do and things to solve in the Balkans before a complete peace can be reached.

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (cam0flage @ Mar. 12 2003,15:23)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Looks like he wasn't particulary popular in former Yugoslavia (I'm not using the word Serbia because the people behind this assassination might well come from the neighbouring countries).<span id='postcolor'>

Wrong interpretation. The only ones that didn't like Djindjic were the Serbian nationalists. All the other countries on the Balkans liked him. This has nothing to do with the other countries, it's strictly a Serbian matter.

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">I guess this is a prime example how there is a lot of work to do and things to solve in the Balkans before a complete peace can be reached.<span id='postcolor'>

This has nothing to do with peace or war. He was most likely assasinated by the mob or by hardcore Milosevic supporters.

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Apparently the local police have yet to apprehend the suspects in the shooting as the city center has been cordoned off and the Belgrade airport has been closed.

I guessed he pissed off too many of the "wrong" sort of people. confused.gif

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (Blaegis @ Mar. 12 2003,15:42)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Yeah, but why close off the airport if they have their suspects?<span id='postcolor'>

There might be two or there might be 30 people involved..

I guess that they do not know so they close the airports.

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (denoir @ Mar. 12 2003,17:28)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE"></span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (cam0flage @ Mar. 12 2003,15:23)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Looks like he wasn't particulary popular in former Yugoslavia (I'm not using the word Serbia because the people behind this assassination might well come from the neighbouring countries).<span id='postcolor'>

Wrong interpretation. The only ones that didn't like Djindjic were the Serbian nationalists. All the other countries on the Balkans liked him. This has nothing to do with the other countries, it's strictly a Serbian matter.<span id='postcolor'>

I know you have been in Kosovo as a peacekeeper and probably know a lot more about the area than I do, but I wouldn't rule out foreign involvement. There have been assassinations of high ranking Serb officials before, which probably have been done by people outside Serbia. I believe the neighbouring countries still harbor a big continent of people with extremist nature and hatred of Serbs. I also agree with you, it could well have been supporters of the old Serb regime.

Assassination of "Arkan"

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Belgrade. Saturday, 15 January 2000. 5.51pm. The indicted warlord Zeljko "Arkan" Raznatovic is sipping tea in the foyer of the Intercontinental Hotel. Evil, ebullient, flamboyant and fat, he sits back, flush on the receipts of his criminal earnings. Then, with the lobby in pleasurable commotion, the bullets begin to fly like hail in Raznatovic's direction.

One in the eye, they say, a slug to the brain; a second in the chest. Enough lead, at point-blank range, for any man to bite the dust. In minutes Arkan, the podgy, baby-faced psychopathic mobster is dead. Killed, perhaps, by some of the very paramilitaries he had reared in a rogue state that he had come to personify.<span id='postcolor'>

Do you remember this? I admit that one cannot compare a person like Arkan to Djindjic, but I just wanted to point out that there have been this kind of events before in Serbia.

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it seems like Arkan is hated by many ppl, so he made a number of enemies. however, this assasination is easily pointed out by the fact that he was a bureaucrat, and was not hated by many ppl. so mobs and Serbian nationalists might work together or they just hired a killer.

yes, Djindjic is dead, but i bet there will be more ppl that will carry his legacy on.

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I hope so sad.gif

This guy always seemed reasonable when i saw him in TV interviews.

I guess being a reasonable politician in the balkans is a dangerous business. As Denoir said i dont think this has to do with peace/war- just internal 'politics' balkans style

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I think you heard wrong

"Serbia was in shock Wednesday after Prime Minister Zoran Djindjic, who played a key role in the overthrow of Slobodan Milosevic and personified the country's postwar future, was shot dead. "

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This is very sad and bad news for Serbia, but not a very big surprise. In fact, I'm a bit surprised he survived this long.

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (cam0flage @ Mar. 12 2003,17:26)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE"></span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">Belgrade. Saturday, 15 January 2000. 5.51pm. The indicted warlord Zeljko "Arkan" Raznatovic is sipping tea in the foyer of the Intercontinental Hotel. Evil, ebullient, flamboyant and fat, he sits back, flush on the receipts of his criminal earnings. Then, with the lobby in pleasurable commotion, the bullets begin to fly like hail in Raznatovic's direction.

One in the eye, they say, a slug to the brain; a second in the chest. Enough lead, at point-blank range, for any man to bite the dust. In minutes Arkan, the podgy, baby-faced psychopathic mobster is dead. Killed, perhaps, by some of the very paramilitaries he had reared in a rogue state that he had come to personify.<span id='postcolor'>

Do you remember this? I admit that one cannot compare a person like Arkan to Djindjic, but I just wanted to point out that there have been this kind of events before in Serbia.<span id='postcolor'>

If anybody deserved to die it was Arkan. The working theory is however that it was an internal mafia settlement.

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (IsthatyouJohnWayne @ 12 2003,20:18)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">

I guess being a reasonable politician in the balkans is a dangerous business. As Denoir said i dont think this has to do with peace/war- just internal 'politics' balkans style

<span id='postcolor'>

Hehe, I know a number of people who would be gravely insulted by your statement. Especially EU candidate countries like Slovenia or Croatia. And they would be right, political assasinations are virtually non-existent. Serbia has a mafia problem and that's the primary source of violence. It's very similar to what Russia was in the pre-Putin era. I would certainly not however characterize their political system as savage or that being a politician in the Balkans is a risky occupation.

On the contrary it's one of the more interesting quirks of the Yugoslav society that goes back to the communist era. They've never had the habit of killing political dissidents or leaders. Sure they were often silenced in one way or another, but never permanent and they would always come back and continue their work. So I would say that calling political assassinations "the Balkan way" is both prejudicial and wrong.

Edit: I might have been a bit premature in my statement that assasinations of politicians are rare. Since Milosevic lost power there has been 45 assasinations of politicians in Serbia. 43 of them were mafia related and two were crimes of passion. They were however all small, local politicians. Djindjic is the first Eurpean government leader to be assassinated since Olof Palme (Swedish PM) was killed in 1986.

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I just spent some time reading various news reports and statements from the neighbouring countries. They are all expressing their disgust with the murder and sympathy towards the Serbian people. The most interesting comments are from Croatia. The Croatian prime minister said that: (approx. translation)

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (Ivica Racan @ ,,,,)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">

The Croatian government is shocked by the murder and I would, speaking for myself and for the government like to extend our sincere and deep condolences to the people and government of Serbia. We in Croatia see this criminal attack as an attack on all democratical efforts in Serbia, Europe and the World.

<span id='postcolor'>

So what's so special about this? Well, Croatia has never ever said something so nice to Serbia. It looks like this incident will bring them closer.

The Belgrade media are demanding a crackdown on the mafia. Judging from the national shock they are in right now, I'd say that they stand a good chance of actually doing it.

This is a very good example of how political assasinations can backfire.

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (denoir @ Mar. 13 2003,02:06)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">So what's so special about this? Well, Croatia has never ever said something so nice to Serbia. It looks like this incident will bring them closer.

The Belgrade media are demanding a crackdown on the mafia. Judging from the national shock they are in right now, I'd say that they stand a good chance of actually doing it.

This is a very good example of how political assasinations can backfire.<span id='postcolor'>

Well lets hope it does bring them closer together. Then the bastards (i think the term is justified) will have reached the opposite of what they wanted. he may have won in death what he couldnt get in live, kinda sad really.

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (denoir @ Mar. 13 2003,02:06)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE"></span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (Ivica Racan @ ,,,,)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">

The Croatian government is shocked by the murder and I would, speaking for myself and for the government like to extend our sincere and deep condolences to the people and government of Serbia. We in Croatia see this criminal attack as an attack on all democratical efforts in Serbia, Europe and the World.

<span id='postcolor'>

So what's so special about this? Well, Croatia has never ever said something so nice to Serbia. It looks like this incident will bring them closer.<span id='postcolor'>

well, after all, he was playing a leading roll in sending Butcher of the Balkans to International Court, so Croatia sees the assasination an insult to Croatia.

BUT!

this is such a disgusting act, that I don't think my reason above is the reason, but Croatia really said it from their heart, with all sincerity.

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"The Belgrade media are demanding a crackdown on the mafia. Judging from the national shock they are in right now, I'd say that they stand a good chance of actually doing it.

This is a very good example of how political assasinations can backfire."- Denoir

I really hope so  wow.gif

During my travels in Greece i met some really friendly Serbian guys who i went out drinking with a few times

-i remember they said that the western media blows things out of proportion, but they didnt try to deny that their country is kind of messed up with mafia, milosevic regime etc

hehe tounge.gif  I also remember getting -embarrassingly- drunk and almost getting in a fight after running up to random Serbian students and teachers and shouting 'Jebem ti mater' (the only insult i could pronounce)  confused.gif  biggrin.gif

What happened in the former yugoslavia was bad for all of europe, and so is an unstable south eastern europe

i hope soon my statement will look prejudicial and wrong.

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For the pleasure of denoir and other notorious advocates of the devil:

The quisling of Belgrade

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">The murdered Serbian prime minister was a reviled western stooge whose economic reforms brought misery.

Neil Clark

Friday March 14, 2003

The Guardian<span id='postcolor'>

Thoughts?

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</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote (Bernadotte @ Mar. 14 2003,16:12)</td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">For the pleasure of denoir and other notorious advocates of the devil:

The quisling of Belgrade

</span><table border="0" align="center" width="95%" cellpadding="3" cellspacing="1"><tr><td>Quote </td></tr><tr><td id="QUOTE">The murdered Serbian prime minister was a reviled western stooge whose economic reforms brought misery.

Neil Clark

Friday March 14, 2003

The Guardian<span id='postcolor'>

Thoughts?<span id='postcolor'>

I think this Neil Clark character had a personal bone to pick with Djinjic, because I'd say 200000 people who paid their respects on the streets of Belgrade today are a pretty clear indication of support for the assassinated PM.

BBC story

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Looks like a very serious step backwards in the rebuilding of Serbia and the surrounding Baltic Countrys.

I hope the guy replacing Djinjic isn't another Milosevik.

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