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cri74

Microsoft vs java

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<object width="640" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8CChujBmtg?fs=1&hl=nb_NO"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8CChujBmtg?fs=1&hl=nb_NO" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="640" height="385"></embed></object>





Edited by cri74

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Nice Video, but not the full Version. Watch this one and see if you can spot the difference

Wt7fH8BDqIc&feature=related

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Nice Video, but not the full Version. Watch this one and see if you can spot the difference

A sex scene of roughly 0,5 seconds? Its cool though. :p

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I bet the short version is for the american nerds out there. They would get a heart attack otherwise. Pr0n+Java=too much :p

Edited by Tonci87

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I think it's pretty funny, but I hate Java's IDEs. Anybody know of a good one to make me think differently.

I've tried NetBeans and JCreator.

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Eclipse. Best IDE I have ever used, no matter the language.

Yea you usually can't go wrong with eclipse, although sometimes it just randomly crashes for me... (could be the fault of plugins though)

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I prefer Netbeans over Eclipse - being a former .Net/VisualStudio developer now doing mainly Java EE and some C development, I somehow never could warm up to Eclipse. The good thing: using Maven the actual IDE doesn't matter. You use the ide you like and collaboration works just fine.

As for the Java vs .Net topic: If you're doing Windows-only development then .Net is perfect: good integration and support (on newer OS versions the runtime is already installed) and you have easy access to all parts of the OS (even to COM components and native apis). If you want to go multi-platform then .Net is crap. Mono supports only part of the Windows .Net api, and you would be a fool to trust M$ to care the least for anything but their own OS regarding patents or changes to the API.

If you want to do desktop apps that are truly multiplattform then I'd rather recommend good old C/C++ (maybe combined with QT or another multi-platform gui framework) instead of Java: you get an executable that just works on a specific platform - without the need to install a seperate runtime - and you have better access to hardware specific features (which may be something as simple as accessing a serial port or reading special system data). There's C/C++ compilers available for almost any hardware available and while the standard libraries are much smaller compared to .Net or Java many popular libraries are also multi-platform.

The downside with using Java for desktop apps is the need for users to install a specific runtime - and the problems you get when you actually need to use native apis. The latter can be done but is quite tedious compared to .Net (on Windows) or C/C++ (on any platform). The real advantage for Java is its server-side usage (Java-based web apps and J2EE): you can easily write software that will run - without recompiling - on Linux, Windows or Unix and which integrates really well into existing enterprise IT structures (where Windows servers are rather rare and support for Java is great). So Java works really well for enterprise applications, for web apps (as a - imo - better alternative to PHP etc.), and for mobile apps (like Android or Java ME stuff) where you have a pre-installed runtime on the device.

The point being: there's no 'X is better than Y' here: both have their place, weaknesses and strengths. The IT world is much bigger than the (almost) Windows-only end-user market, and out there .Net is rather useless. Java on the other hand missed it's opportunity of becoming a platform for great desktop apps long ago - mostly due to performance issues with older versions of the runtime and Microsofts early attempts to fight it's usage on the Windows platform.

The good thing: there's always C/C++ :)

Edited by Daddl

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vim is my IDE. Eclipse and Netbeans make me want to cry.

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Never could get much love for Eclipse somehow.

I've used NetBeans for some months, but my primairy language is Ruby,

RubyMine IDE (by Jetbrains) is quicker with supporting the latest tech, which is using the same IDE-base as their Java variant, see for details; http://www.jetbrains.com/.

Lately im working a lot with IronRuby (Ruby on .NET), and that put me to use Visual Studio 2010;

nice IDE imo :) Especially the dialog designer :)

For some simple editing, arma scripts and configs I've jumped between Notepad++, UltraEdit and EditPad Pro, and i've stuck with EditPad Pro for the time being.

Edited by Sickboy

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For some simple editing, arma scripts and configs I've jumped between Notepad++, UltraEdit and EditPad Pro, and i've stuck with EditPad Pro for the time being.

Well, currently I've found that I've really no use for anything more powerful than Notepad for anything ArmA related... hasn't failed me yet.

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For some simple editing, arma scripts and configs I've jumped between Notepad++, UltraEdit and EditPad Pro, and i've stuck with EditPad Pro for the time being.

Notepad++ is THE text editor when using Windows. What i really like with Notepad++ are its filtering options and support for regex based search (perfect for checking huge log files from multithreaded apps). My work environment is usually Linux, tho, so I mostly use gedit for things like SQL scripts, or quick changes to C source or header files.

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Well, currently I've found that I've really no use for anything more powerful than Notepad for anything ArmA related... hasn't failed me yet.
A good text editor with syntax highlighting and regex search/replace is half the work :D Not to mention a proper UNDO/REDO (Notepad only does the last action).

You can use a knife to unscrew a screw, yet a screwdriver does it better :P

But I agree, one doesn't always need a swiss-pocket-knife.

Notepad++ is THE text editor when using Windows. What i really like with Notepad++ are its filtering options and support for regex based search (perfect for checking huge log files from multithreaded apps). My work environment is usually Linux, tho, so I mostly use gedit for things like SQL scripts, or quick changes to C source or header files.
I was a big fan of Notepad++ as well, but i've had problems with locking up tabs for short times when having very large files open, or even config dumps like AllInOne configs,

this was with C++ syntax highlighting enabled.

Also my settings seemed to corrupt every now and then, leaving me with an error at startup and unconfigured/malconfigured application.. :headbang: :D

For now im pretty content with EditPad Pro, I also use it's brother; PowerGREP :)

Edited by Sickboy

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Be real tough, edit your A2 scripts on a Nux box with vi!! :D

real_programmers.png

:)

personally I prefer sed... ;)

Edited by Daddl

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echo '[q]sa[ln0=aln256%Pln256/snlbx]sb3445875140377008882411131260277245374291snlbxq' | dc

;)

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A good text editor with syntax highlighting and regex search/replace is half the work :D Not to mention a proper UNDO/REDO (Notepad only does the last action).

You can use a knife to unscrew a screw, yet a screwdriver does it better :P

But I agree, one doesn't always need a swiss-pocket-knife.

And I do use Notepad++ for doing stuff in C; it's great. It's just that when I'm working on ArmA stuff I rarely need anything but simple text editing. It's like SQF has become a second language to me... :eek:

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